Tag Archives: RA 10175

15 January 2013 #RA10175

Today marks the day for the oral arguments for and against the constitutionality of Republic Act 10175, or the Anti-Cybercrime law, at the Philippine Supreme Court. Netizens once again call for profile/account “blackouts” similar to that made on 2 October 2012, when the law was supposed to be made effective days after its publication (until its implementation was suspended due to a Temporary Restraining Order [TRO] by the Court).


I. Privacy of Communication and correspondence, and Right to Due Process
II. Freedom of expression, and Internet Libel
III. Actual controversy
IV. Cybercrime Law


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“¿Para qué estáis en el gobierno?”

An interesting article from the Philippine Inquirer came out yesterday. [1] This appears to be resulting from the online backlash against Senator Sotto over his purported role in the controversial Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012, especially as to the Senate insertion of the Section 4(c)(4) pertaining to Internet libel. [2]

If the newspaper’s quotes are to be taken to be accurate, Senator Sotto allegedly said [3]:

“Gusto nila magpa-file naman ako ng bill, alisin na natin ang libel para pwede ko na rin silang murahin (If they want, I will file a bill to remove libel so I can also engage them in mudslinging),” Sotto said in an interview over radio on Wednesday.

“Pwede, alisin natin para parehas na ang laban. Maganda yan, pag-aaralan ko yan hanggang Lunes (We can remove that to have a fair play. That’s a good idea. I will study that until Monday),” he said.

“Alisin na natin ang gag sa masama broadcast, sa radyo, sa TV. Kung malaya sa Internet, pwede silang mambastos, mambaboy…gawin na din natin sa media. Kailangan pare-parehas,” Sotto added.

Asked if he was serious about his proposal, the senator said, “Oo, tinatabla lang natin sila sa inyo (Yes, we’re just levelling the playing field.)”

“Hindi na decriminalizing, removing. Magda-draft ako in the next few days (We will no longer decriminalize libel, we will remove it altogether. I will make a draft in the next few days),” he said.

It would be somehow expected that reactions to these statement would be to the effect that such statements would be adolescent, and not one expected from a legislator. I leave that sentiment to others, as my attention is elsewhere.


I. What can we say and how we go about it?
II. For whose interest are legislations made?


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2 October 2012 Blackout

On 2 October 2012, Philippine netizens who are opposed to the Cybercrime Law started to censor their comments in Facebook and Twitter, and use black images as profile pictures therein, as a form of protest. I cannot blackout this blog since I am not under paid hosting. In lieu thereof, this is what I wish to say on the matter:

I █████ ████ ██ █████████ ██ ████████████ ██ ████████ ██ ███ ██ ██ ██ ██████ ██ █ believe that ███████ ██ ██ ███ ████████ █████ ██ ██ ██ ██ █████ ██████████ ██ █████ █████ ██ ███████ ███ ████ ███████ ██ ████████ ██ ███████████ █████ ██ the Philippine ██████████ ██ ███████ ████ █████ ████████ ████ ███ ██████████████ █████ ██ ███ ████████ ███ ██████████ ██ ███ ███████ █████ ████ ██████ ████ ██ ███████ ██ ██ ██ ██████ ████ ████ ██ ██ ██ ██████ ████████ ███ ████ ██ ██████ ██ ██ ██████ ████████ ██ █ █████ ███████ ██ █████████ ███████ ███ government█ ██ ██ ██ █████████ ██████ ████ ███████ █ ███ ████ ██ ███ ███████ █████ ██ █████ can ████████ ████ ██████ ███ █████████ ███████ ███████ ████ ██████████ █████ ███████ ███ do ████████ ███████ █ ██████████ ████████ ██ ████████ █████ ██ █████ ██ no ███ ██████ ████ ███████ ██ ████ ████████████ ██████ ██ ███ ██████ ███ ██████ ███████████████ ██ ██████████ ██ ███████ ██ ██████ █████████ ████ ███████ ██ █████ █████ ██ █████████ wrong. █ ████ ██ ███████ ████ █ ████ ██ █ ██████████ ████████

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Republic Act 10175: Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012


Licensed under CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivative 3.0 Philippine license.


I. Introduction
    > Past proposals for an Anti-CyberCrime Law
II. Offenses under RA 10175
    > Child pornography under RA 9775, viz Section 4(c)(2) of RA 10175
    > Section 33 (a) of RA 8792, viz Section 4(a)(1) to (5) of RA 10175
    > New offenses under RA 10175
    > Other offenses under Section 5, RA 10175
    > Applicability to other penal laws, when crime committed using ICT, under Section 6, RA 10175
III. Contentious issue: Libel viz Freedom of Expression
    > Libel under Chapter 1, Title XIII of the Revised Penal Code (Act 3815 [RPC], 8 December 1930)
    > Libel under Section 4(c)(4), RA 10175
    > Freedom of Expression viz libel
    > Doctrine of privileged communication
    > ICCPR and General Comment No. 34
IV. Contentious issue: Privacy
    > Right to privacy
    > Section 12 to 17, RA 10175
    > Privacy in relation to Section 12, RA 10175
    > International Cooperation
V. Jurisdiction
VI. Admissibility of Evidence
VII. Takedowns
VIII. Conclusion


I
Introduction

There has been a lot of discussions observed days subsequent to the promulgation of Republic Act 10175, or the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012, on 12 September 2012. There are some who assail the law to be unconstitutional as it acts as a prior restraint to freedom of speech, or that it provides undue expanded interference of private activities in the Internet by the Philippine Government, among others. Let me form my opinion herein, without providing legal advice, regarding the present law in its final form.

Past proposals for an Anti-CyberCrime Law

The Anti-Cybercrime law was not a recent proposal. Prior versions have been introduced in previous Congresses but which have been archived when the previous Congresses adjourned, including the 14th Congress. It appears that prior versions were being pushed to meet (1) the urgency to penalize child pornography; (2) rectify the perceived weakness of provision(s) on computer-related crimes in Republic Act 8792, or the Electronic Commerce Act (2000); (3) the necessity of expanding the coverage of the applicability of electronic documents, or ITC-enable acts, to criminal/penal laws, especially those in the Revised Penal Code, where documents, or in which a computer may be used in the commission thereof, are involved; (4) the necessity to provide an efficient legal procedure/allowance in the acquisition of evidence by government agencies when crimes are being committed, or have been committed, through electronic means; and (5) arrangement towards international cooperation, as acts may be transnational.

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